Stats based Analytical view point on Edging a seaming New Ball & other Modes of Dismissals faced by Openers/Front Order Batsmen

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Facing Pace bowlers, the openers & front-order batsman mostly get out caught, due to new ball movement induced edging. Basically most of those catches resulted from not-middling well enough to tackle the new ball movement they are especially vulnerable (movement in the air & off the deck) compared to other batters. Therefore, it is a good indicator to see how often they have got out CAUGHT facing PACE BOWLERS ONLY in each opener/ front order batsman’s dismissal record in their career stats to judge their ability to handle the ball movement properly (middle it) without edging catches to get out: 

Overall Dismissal modes of some front order batsmen facing Pace Bowlers ONLY in their careers:

Sanga:    210 dismsls  -   25b  -   168c    -  15 lbw   -  80.0 % caught
Dilly :      154 dismsls -    35b   -   112c    -    6 lbw   -  72.7% caught
Upul :      119 dismsls  -   23b  -     90c    -    6 lbw   -  75.6 % caught  
Mahela:   218 dismsls  -   25b  -   167c   -    25 lbw  -  76.6 % caught
Sanath:   311 dismsls  -    42b  -   223c  -    41 lbw  -   71.6 %  caught         

Percentage of deferent dismissal modes in their careers facing Pace Attacks:  

Sanga :   80.0%  Caught  -  7.1 % lbw - 11.9 %  Bowled
Mahela:   76.6 % Caught -   11.4% lbw – 11.5% Bowled
Upul :      75. 6 % Caught –  5.0 % lbw  - 19.3 % Bowled
Dilshan:   72.7% Caught –    3.8 % lbw – 22.7 % Bowled
Sanath :  71.6 % Caught –  13.2 % lbw – 13.5 % Bowled

According to the above stats, this is the dismissal-vulnerability-order ranked according to the each mode of dismissal facing seam attacks in their careers (five front-order batsmen compared in this analysis). 

Dismissal-Vulnerability-Order (facing Pace Bowlers):

Getting Caught: 
                           1) Sanga:  80.0% 
                           2) Mahela: 76.6% 
                           3) Upul:     75.6%  
                           4) Dilshan: 72.7% 
                           5) Sanath: 71.6%

Getting lbw :      
                           1) Sanath: 13.2%
                           2) Mahela: 11.4%  
                           3) Sanga:    7.1%   
                           4) Upul:       5.0 %   
                           5) Dilshan:  3.8%

Getting Bowled: 
                           1) Dilshan:  22.7% 
                           2) Upul:      19.3%
                           3) Sanath:   13.5% 
                           4) Sanga:    11.9 % 
                           5) Mahela:   11.5%

This analysis gives the realistic picture of each batsman’s capability & vulnerability in different areas concerned including the most important aspect of handling the new ball movement of seam bowlers without edging catches.

This proves the fact that every front-order batsman is more vulnerable to get out caught, facing pace bowlers as the high probability ranges from 70 to 80% . It also proves that Upul Tharanga’s tendency is medium & he doesn’t have any unusual weakness of edging & getting caught facing pace, compared to others (UT’s 75.6% is better than Sanga/ Mahela & close to Dilshan’s) as repeatedly speculated by some critics with Selective Perceptions. They have even disregarded Tharanga’s 2nd best all time batting record in such countries, conducive to seam bowling:  48 in- 1631 runs - 35.45 Av, just behind Sanga (37.59 Av), when picking him for every single occasion he edges the ball like any other opener. These stats show, even UT’s frequency of other dismissal modes (lbw or bowled) are not in the top bracket of compared players.

As evident from this, most criticism are baseless speculations blown out of proportion to suit ulterior motives of some, who propagate such fabrications targeting the gullible fans.!      

Comments

Anonymous's picture

Superb analysis HumbleBee. this certainly a good eye-opener for those who blindly criticize Upul for every single moment that he edges, completely ignoring to notice how many times every other opener around the world does that in initial spells.

SL is an amazing country. any henchman in media boxes can easily mislead majority, with no commonsense to judge things on their own by using head. :)

Anonymous's picture

hehehehe kindergarten analysis. 'caught' also means 'caught at mid on,mid off, third man, short leg, point etc.

how does this show UT doens't have weakness of nicking behind? can u provide the stats for 'caught behinds'? not just 'caught'. That's misleading.

HumbleBee's picture
Member since:
9 March 2011
Last activity:
2 weeks 4 days

Quote " Openers & Front order Batsmen CAUGHT facing PACE BOWLERS ONLY"

" openers & front-order batsman mostly get out caught, due to new ball movement induced edging. Basically most of those catches resulted from not-middling well enough to tackle the new ball movement they are especially vulnerable (movement in the air & off the deck) compared to other batters. Therefore, it is a good indicator to see how often they have got out CAUGHT facing PACE BOWLERS ONLY "

It seems some don't understand the meaning of probability & higher incidence, in this case confined to just "Openers & front order Batsmen" facing "pace bowling only"! the majority of catches generated by pacemen to "Openers & Front Order" are due to improper middling of the new ball movement, resulted in edges & nicks (unlike spinners)! As clearly stated, my analysis are based on that fact, agreeing or not is up to you.

(Last edited by HumbleBee on February 8, 2015 - 21:15)
Anonymous's picture

hehehe. another kindergarten theory based on 'assumption'. if a batsman don't middle the ball, he can be caught at midwicket or covers as well. whatever helps u to sleep at night. pretty sure UT will lead the pack if you look at the 'caught behind' only. no doubts.

Anonymous's picture

As we all know, enticing the batsman to edge and hit a catch to the slips cordon or wicket-keeper is the standard wicket-taking tactic in off theory for pace bowlers. To do so, the bowler tries to make the ball deviate off its expected line away from the batsman's body on the off-side. making Outswingers. It is also a well known fact, when conventional openers get out caught facing pacemen, the higher percentage is due to such edging not only to keeper, but any fielder behind, mostly to slip cordon (but this doesn't mean that their cannot be any catches going to any other fielder, especially if a makeshift sloger is opening). For analytical purposes consiidering any higher incidence is quite acceptable & sensible. As learned would know, most statistical analysis are based on that probability.

when you look at this analysis from that perceptive it is far bettter to consider the CAUGHT parameter rather than just "Caught Behind" which doesn't include the most frequent slip catches edged by all openers & frontline batsmen.

It is interseting to note Sanath's higher lbw dismissals & Dilly's & Upul's higher Bowled dismissals. i guess they reflect their batting techniques & stats tally with them. Also, Sanga's higher caught incidence for pacies were more prominent up to mid way of his career than the recent times. His batting has improved immensely during the past few years.

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